Bars in Paris sell takeout alcohol

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Bars in Paris sell takeout alcohol





© AFP
Aperitifs in the grass are increasing in big cities, and especially in the capital, to compensate for the closing of bars, maintained despite the deconfinement. Some establishments have however chosen to reopen their terraces and thus organize the sale of take-away alcohol.


Cafes and restaurants could reopen on June 2, after nearly three months of closure due to the epidemic of coronavirus… But some have already reopened their terraces informally. In the capital, deprived of its parks, points of sale of take-away alcohol are multiplying and the unconventional aperitif is shared in the street, giving life to the neighborhoods. “It smells like the end of hell,” says Maxime, manager of a bar, with a sigh of relief. “I think the hardest part was walking around and seeing everything closed.”

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“I don’t have a problem”

Habits have resumed in this bistro in the 14th arrondissement. The pergola has been deployed, a few tables installed but no chairs. Only two customers wear a mask, not very practical for sipping their beer. “As long as people who come from different places stay far away, I don’t have a problem,” said Maxime. According to him, the survival of his establishment depended on this partial opening.

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In a bar-restaurant in the 11th arrondissement, a dozen neighbors are gathered in front of the wide open picture window. A table acts as a separation, so that no one enters inside, and serves as a counter. “We saw the light and the people who were drinking outside, we said ‘here we can have a drink’,” laughs Marie, in her forties. As a return to her student years, she sits on the sidewalk with her friends at least and a plastic cup in hand. “[C’est] like an oasis in the desert! ”

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