Coronavirus may be multiplying cases of children with symptoms of rare Kawasaki disease, according to the latest data from an Italian study

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Coronavirus may be multiplying cases of children with symptoms of rare Kawasaki disease, according to the latest data from an Italian study



Coronavirus may be multiplying cases of children with symptoms of rare Kawasaki disease, according to the latest data from an Italian study

  • The coronavirus could have multiplied by 30 the cases of a serious inflammatory disease in children, according to a new study published in The Lancet.
  • Right now, there are cases registered in New York, Italy, Spain, the United Kingdom, France, Switzerland and Switzerland.
  • “Our study provides the first clear evidence of a link between SARS-CoV-2 infection and this inflammatory condition,” the authors note.
  • Despite the data, the study warns that this phenomenon “probably does not affect more than 1 in 1,000 children exposed to the SARS-CoV-2 virus.”
  • Discover more stories at Business Insider Spain.

Coronavirus could have multiplied by 30 the cases of a serious inflammatory disease in children, according to a new study published in The Lancet who has reviewed the cases of 10 patients in Italy.

In New York, there have also been 100 cases with this table so far. In Europe, in addition to Italy, Cases have been seen in Spain, the United Kingdom, France and Switzerland.

“We are starting to see case reports of children presenting in hospitals with signs of Kawasaki disease in other areas severely affected by the Covid-19 pandemic,” explains Lorenzo D’Antiga, co-author of the study. “Our study provides the first clear evidence of a link between SARS-CoV-2 infection and this inflammatory condition,” he notes.

Kawasaki disease is a condition that typically affects children under the age of 5. It causes blood vessels to become inflamed and swollen, and typical symptoms include fever and rashes, redness of various parts of the body, and swollen glands.

The presence of antibodies suggests that Italian children, like many of the cases in the United States, became infected with the virus weeks before presenting symptoms of Kawasaki disease. Experts say the new inflammatory syndrome appears to be a delayed reaction driven by the child’s immune system response to infection., as he explains The New York Times.

Most worryingly, patients suffering from this do not seem to respond well to standard coronavirus treatment. Furthermore, the symptoms are more severe than a real Kawasaki syndrome, the study warns.

Although the incidence of cases during the pandemic appeared about 30 times higher than usual, Kawasaki syndrome-like symptoms probably do not affect more than 1 in 1,000 children exposed to the SARS-CoV-2 virus, the authors note.

“In our experience, only a very small proportion of children infected with SARS-CoV-2 develop symptoms of Kawasaki disease.”, Annalisa Gervasoni, a pediatrician at the Papa Giovanni XXIII Hospital in Bergamo and one of the authors of the study, tells Bloomberg.

“However, it is important to understand the consequences of the virus in children, particularly as the countries of the world face plans to begin to relax policies of social distancing,” he warns.

The de-escalation measures— which have allowed the children to become confused in the first place and some are already considering the return to the classrooms—They were already being questioned due to the lack of information on the role that children play in the spread of the disease.

May 14, 2020 3:30 PM.

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