Comet Neowise Shines in the Sky of British Columbia

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Comet Neowise Shines in the Sky of British Columbia





© Gian-Paolo Mendoza / Radio-Canada
Comet Neowise C / 2020 F3 may not be visible again for 6800 years.


A comet observable with the naked eye delights amateur astronomers, who for several days have been at the forefront of a spectacle as unusual as it is fascinating, in British Columbia as elsewhere in North America.

Named Neowise, after the powerful telescope which discovered it on March 27, the star is visible soon after sunset. The curious should direct their gaze to the northwest, suggests the space center astronomer H.R. MacMillan from Vancouver, Rachel Wang.

It is a chance not to be missed, she said, since the comet will not be visible for another 6800 years.


Currently, no binoculars or telescopes are required to observe the comet.


© offer each pair Stephen Tam
Currently, no binoculars or telescopes are required to observe the comet.


Formerly a ball of ice and rock orbiting the sun, Neowise probably comes from the outer edges of the solar system.

When they revolve around the sun, comets become brighter as they warm up and their solid matter turns to gas.


The comet originates from the outer edges of the solar system, according to astronomers.


© Offer by Rene Warren
The comet originates from the outer edges of the solar system, according to astronomers.


Neowise has two trails, says Ms. Wang. One is made of fluffy dust, the other of an ionic charge which points in different directions.

This is why in some photos, a small blue ionic tail is visible, she says.

Neowise is in the constellation Lynx, which looks like a large zigzag, just below the constellation Ursa Major, which includes the Big Dipper.

With information from CBC

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