Mongolia ordered quarantine and closure of part of the border with Russia after reported deaths from bubonic plague

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Mongolia ordered quarantine and closure of part of the border with Russia after reported deaths from bubonic plague





© Provided by Infobae
Mongolian health personnel in the region affected by an outbreak of bubonic plague (Centralasia.Media)


Mongolia ordered entry into quarantine from the city of Tsetseg, in the western province of Khov, after two deaths were detected by bubonic plague, as reported by local health authorities. A partial closure of the border with Russia was also ordered, to avoid an outbreak that could spread beyond the country’s limits.

The victims, whose identity was not disclosed so far, had consumed groundhog meat. The disease is also known in the region as “groundhog plague” “Specialists from the National Center for Disease Control and Prevention (NCDC) and the National Center for Disease Control and Prevention (NCDC) in Khovd and Bayan-Ulgii are working to establish a quarantine in Jargalant and Tsetseg soums“They said from the local government.

In the two confirmed cases, 146 first contact and 504 second contact individuals were identified, and 146 first contact samples were collected and analyzed, Indicated the sanitarians in the statement. The affected place is about 500 kilometers south of Siberia. The Russian state news service, Tass, confirmed the immigration closure to prevent the passage of private vehicles and the transport of merchandise.

It is not the first time that Mongolia has resorted to a similar measure on that edge.. Previously closed a key border crossing with Russia in May 2019 on suspicion that it may have played a role in an outbreak of the plague, leaving several Russian tourists stranded. A couple had died after eating groundhog meat in that incident.


Groundhogs are the preferred rodents of part of the Mongolian population. Their hunting and consumption are prohibited to prevent the spread of contagious diseases (Shutterstock.com)


© Provided by Infobae
Groundhogs are the preferred rodents of part of the Mongolian population. Their hunting and consumption are prohibited to prevent the spread of contagious diseases (Shutterstock.com)


Experts say that direct descendants of the same bubonic plague that killed 50 million people in the 14th century still exist today, killing some 2,000 people a year. Hunting and consumption of groundhog meat is prohibited. However, the local population feeds on the rodent frequently despite health warnings.

Bubonic plague

The “deadly pestilence”, as Giovanni Boccaccio called it in the introduction to his famous DecameronSet in 1348 in a ghostly Florence, it decimated the population of all Europe. The outbreak is estimated to have originated in the Gobi Desert in Central Asia, and from there it was moved by Mongolian troops from the “Golden Horde” to the Black Sea, from where it later spread to the rest of the continent.. Its great geographical expansion was due to the intense traffic of merchant ships, which spread the epidemic outbreak first through the Italian ports and, from there, to the rest of the continent.

What was the “black plague”? It was a disease caused by the bacteria yersina pestis, which affected rodents and, through their parasites – specifically, the fleas of rats – infected the population. In a period of between 16 and 23 days, the first symptoms manifested, which included inflammation of the nodules of the lymphatic system in the groin, armpits or neck, which was accompanied by high fever and suppurations. The name “bubonic plague” derives from the name given to the inflamed lymph node: “bubo”.

The key event in the transmission of this zoonosis – an infection that occurs in animals and is transmitted to humans – would have been the conquest of the strategic port city of Caffa (now Feodosia), on the Crimean peninsula. Historical accounts indicate that Mongol invaders dumped infected corpses to intimidate the beleaguered population. This operation constituted one of the first documented historical experiences of what we now know as “bacteriological warfare.” In their flight, the Genoese sailors, who had a commercial colony in Caffa, crossed the Mediterranean and initially transferred the plague to the port of Messina, on the island of Sicily, in October 1347.

This pandemic is believed to have killed 200 million people worldwide Asia and Europe.

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