Disney decided to generate a warning about racism in some of its films

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Disney decided to generate a warning about racism in some of its films







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Disney decided to take this measure as a result of requests from groups such as the African American Film Critics Association, the Coalition of Asians Pacific and the Gay and Lesbian Alliance against Defamation.

Therefore, the platform Disney+, what will arrive in Latin America on November 17, it will contain a warning about racist connotations on a plate that subscribers can see before playing several of his classics such as: “Peter Pan” (1953), “Dumbo” (1951) or “The Jungle Book” (1967).






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The content of the warning highlights: “This program includes negative representations and / or mistreatment of people or cultures. These stereotypes were wrong at that time and they are wrong now too. Instead of removing this content, we decided warn about harmful impact and learn about this for build a more inclusive future together“.

He also reported that Disney is committed to creating stories with inspiring themes Y aspirational that reflect the rich diversity of human experience all over the planet ”.

On his website he also provides detailed information and reflections on the content notice on four of his films:






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Aristocats: the cat is depicted as a racist caricature of the East Asian peoples with exaggerated stereotypical features such as slanted eyes and closed teeth. He sings in lightly accented English voiced by a white actor and plays the piano with chopsticks. This representation reinforces the stereotype of the “perpetual foreigner,” while the film also features lyrics that poke fun at the Chinese language and culture, such as “Shanghai, Hong Kong, Egg Foo Young. The fortune cookie is always wrong. “






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Dumbo: The ravens and musical number pay homage to racist minstrel shows, where white performers with blackened faces and tattered clothing imitated and ridiculed enslaved Africans on southern plantations. The leader of the group in Dumbo is Jim Crow, who shares the name of the laws that enforce racial segregation in the southern United States. In “The Song of the Roustabouts,” faceless black workers bustle with offensive lyrics such as “When we get paid, we throw away all our money.”






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Peter Pan: The film portrays the natives in a stereotypical way that reflects neither the diversity of the native peoples nor their authentic cultural traditions. It shows them speaking in unintelligible language and repeatedly refers to them as “redskins,” an offensive term. Peter and the Lost Boys dance, wear headdresses and other exaggerated tropes, a form of mockery and appropriation of indigenous peoples’ culture and images.






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Swiss Family Robinson: The pirates who oppose the Robinson family are portrayed as a stereotypical foreign threat. Many appear with “yellow face” or “brown face” and are disguised in an exaggerated and inaccurate way with high knot hairstyles, tails, robes and exaggerated facial makeup and jewelry, which reinforces their barbarism and “otherness”. They speak in an indecipherable language, presenting a unique and racist representation of the peoples of Asia and the Middle East.

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