Faced with Covid-19, All Saints holidays far away from grandparents

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Faced with Covid-19, All Saints holidays far away from grandparents




As the All Saints' Day holidays begin on Friday evening, many grandparents will have to break traditions by not welcoming their grandchildren for the occasion. Faced with the resurgence of Covid-19 cases, and the elderly being among the most vulnerable to the virus, many reunions are postponed to later in order to protect the elderly.


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As the All Saints’ Day holidays begin on Friday evening, many grandparents will have to break traditions by not welcoming their grandchildren for the occasion. Faced with the resurgence of Covid-19 cases, and the elderly being among the most vulnerable to the virus, many reunions are postponed to later in order to protect the elderly.

The All Saints holidays begin Friday evening for millions of children in France. Holidays that many of them usually spend with their grandparents. But the Covid-19 broke into our lives this year, sweeping away the habits of the youngest who do not want their elders to take risks. “We are careful because my father is afraid that they catch the Covid”, explains one of them, at the microphone of Europe 1, testifying to the heavy responsibility carried by the children.

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“I want to see them, but…”

If these children are distraught, their grandparents are just as much, sad to have to deprive themselves of these moments of reunion, although they are aware of the health imperatives. “I want to see them, but we are in a health emergency,” says Annie, Parisian grandmother of six grandchildren living in the Var. Faced with the coronavirus, she made the decision not to host them this year. “I would have TB and would like to see them at all costs so I would bring them in? Well no, it would be the same!” she says.

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“God knows if I want to see them, if I miss my grandchildren, and if I am happy to have them and that they return it to me well”, continues Annie. “But if it’s to be worried, no! Relations must be serene and affectionate, and not with this sword of Damocles.”

While the most serious forms of coronavirus have been observed mainly in patients over the age of 65, the oldest people need to protect themselves more. In its weekly epidemiological update, Thursday, Public Health France was alarmed by a “very worrying increase in the number of cases in the elderly”.

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