Majority of Germans change travel plans

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Majority of Germans change travel plans




The autumn / winter trips look different for many Germans this year.


© Hadrian / Shutterstock.com
The autumn / winter trips look different for many Germans this year.


The existing bans on accommodation in numerous federal states are apparently causing a majority of Germans to rethink. As a survey by the opinion research institute Civey on behalf of the “Tagesspiegel” showed, more than 45 percent of German citizens will change their travel plans by the end of the year due to the corona restrictions. 13 percent are still undecided, but 42 percent are sticking to their plans.

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In particular, residents in large cities would cancel en masse, it is said, because many metropolises have been declared risk areas that are directly affected by the bans on accommodation. You could only be accommodated in some federal states with a negative corona test. In addition, older people seem to be more cautious than younger people: 37 percent of those aged 18 to 29 change their plans, and more than 50 percent of those aged 65 and over.

Regardless of their own plans, 52 percent of those surveyed considered the ban on lodging to be generally appropriate. Here, too, approval increased with age. Only 42 percent of those under 30 found the ban correct, compared to 56 percent for pensioners.

Massive criticism of hostel bans

In many federal states, there are currently different bans on accommodation for tourists from risk areas within Germany with a corona 7-day incidence of more than 50 cases per 100,000 inhabitants. However, these bans are met with harsh criticism from parts of politics, medicine and law. The measures are neither targeted nor appropriate or proportionate, it says. Several pending lawsuits could end the measures in the next few days.

Among other things, the Governing Mayor of Berlin, Michael Müller (55, SPD), spoke out against such a regulation. The bans are pointless, he said on the ZDF program “Berlin direkt”: “We have hundreds of thousands of commuters every day. They meet in retail, in local transport, at work. And then a Berliner is not allowed to spend two days in the Spreewald . None of that makes sense. ”

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