The MAH offers its visitors an original sensory experience

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The MAH offers its visitors an original sensory experience


Conceived by the artist duo Charlotte Nordin and Raphaël Ortis, the “Résonances” project aims to transcribe musical emotions through vibrations.


The MAH offers a sensory journey on vibrating boxes, in the middle of the landscapes painted by Alexandre Calame and François Diday.


© KEYSTONE / SALVATORE DI NOLFI
The MAH offers a sensory journey on vibrating boxes, in the middle of the landscapes painted by Alexandre Calame and François Diday.


The Museum of Art and History (MAH) offers during the week of autumn holidays to combine music and vibrations in one of its exhibition rooms. Entitled “Resonances”, the sensory experience is unprecedented, the cultural institution indicates on Monday.

Conceived by the artist duo Charlotte Nordin and Raphaël Ortis, the project aims to transcribe musical emotions through vibrations. It is based on research carried out at the universities of Copenhagen and Reykjavik on the perception of music by deaf people with cochlear implants.

Five boxes on which you can sit or lie down have been placed in the MAH room which houses grandiose landscapes by Alexandre Calame and François Diday. Under each of these bases, a sort of saucer, connected to the instruments and microphones, is responsible for transmitting the vibrations to the wooden structure.

The entire range of sounds that the human ear can perceive is thus reproduced in vibrations, from the lowest frequencies to the highest, located at 20,000 hertz, explains Raphaël Ortis. The musical programming will seek, for its part, to offer the widest possible range of sounds.

An evolving project

“Résonances” is an experience that combines the aerial diffusion of sound, its vibrating diffusion and the gesture of the musician, notes M.Ortis. The project is intended to evolve. Feedback from visitors is expected. They will be invited to give their impressions by choosing from a list of around twenty adjectives.

This project is primarily intended for people with disabilities, deaf children, young people with mental problems, people with Alzheimer’s disease. However, it will be open to everyone next week, during the autumn holidays.

The activity is part of the museum’s accessibility policy, notes the cultural mediator Alix Fiassion. For the public, registrations are compulsory. Places are in fact severely limited because of health measures linked to the Covid-19 pandemic. Each day will host a different concert.

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