These are the organs affected by the coronavirus in 70% of asymptomatic patients

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These are the organs affected by the coronavirus in 70% of asymptomatic patients




These are the organs affected by the coronavirus in 70% of asymptomatic patients. Photo: iStock


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These are the organs affected by the coronavirus in 70% of asymptomatic patients. Photo: iStock


Since the pandemic of Covid-19, experts recognized that many people could contract the virus and not show symptoms, that is, they would be asymptomatic patients. However, the doubt persists: How does the coronavirus affect the asymptomatic?

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), suggest that between 20 and 50% of those infected do not experience noticeable symptoms. Against this background, the risk of contagion it is higher because the virus is more difficult to identify and control.

Body damage from covid-19 in asymptomatic patients

A recent study by the Houston Medical Institute, revealed that the 70% of asymptomatic patients (in their great majority young), they have an affected organ after four months to have been infected, with which it is shown that the long-term consequences can be dangerous.

Sonia Villapol, Principal Investigator of this institute assures that the coronavirus can reach the brain and affect the layer that protects the nerve endings, which can trigger serious neurological problems, such as Parkinson’s, thrombi, cerebrovascular problems, multiple sclerosis, even Alzheimer’s.

Most of the asymptomatic coronavirus patients are left with a damaged organ after four months of contracting the disease, including neurological problems, since the Covid-19 it can damage tissues.

A study published in “Annals of Internal Medicine”, 51% of the cases of asymptomatic people have presented pulmonary abnormalities, according to the chest scans.

Experts from Mayo Clinic ensure that organs affected by Covid-19 include:

  • The heart. Imaging tests taken months after recovery from Covid-19 have shown lasting damage to the heart muscle, even in people with only mild symptoms of Covid-19. This can increase the risk of heart failure or other heart complications in the future.

  • Lungs. The type of pneumonia often associated with COVID-19 can cause lasting damage to the tiny air sacs (alveoli) in the lungs. The resulting scar tissue can lead to long-term breathing problems.

  • Brain. Even in young people, the coronavirus can cause heart attacks, seizures, and Guillain-Barré syndrome – a condition that causes temporary paralysis. It can also increase your risk of developing Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s disease.

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