They want it as a gift … A VACCINE

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They want it as a gift ... A VACCINE


Who in their right mind could imagine that, on Children’s Day, boys and girls would ask for a gift … for an injection? Because times have changed, and after more than seven months bombarded with information and care dictated by the new coronavirus pandemic, the desire is unique: a vaccine to end humanity’s suffering. In thought and on paper, Letícia Gabriele Simões da Cruz, 7, considers immunization to be the most precious and expected asset at this time. “I’m not afraid of an injection. The vaccine will save lives. Everyone is very concerned about the disease, right? ”, Summarizes the daughter of nurse Luana Simões Alves Guimarães da Cruz and businessman Lucas Manoel, sister of little Lucca Gabriel, aged 1 year and 8 months.



Letícia Simões drew her mother applying medicine:


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Letícia Simões drew her mother applying medicine:

At the invitation of the State of Minas, five children drew the way they imagine the routine of their parents, health professionals, working in hospitals, caring for patients at home or in other situations. A resident of the Glória neighborhood, in the northwest region of the capital, Leticia drew a nurse with a green coat giving an injection to a boy. “I love to draw … make a free drawing”, explains the second year elementary school student.



Giovana Astolfi Cardoso used her imagination to portray her mother's work, the physiotherapist Rozana Astolfi Cardoso


© Túlio Santos / EM / DA Press
Giovana Astolfi Cardoso used her imagination to portray her mother’s work, the physiotherapist Rozana Astolfi Cardoso

A nurse for 13 years at Santa Casa BH, the largest philanthropic health institution 100% SUS in Minas, in the hospital region of the capital, Luana Simões says that throughout the period of social isolation – on March 11, the World Health Organization (WHO ) declared the advancement of the new coronavirus as a pandemic – it maintained its routine in the hospital. “The most important thing is self-care. My daughter understood the changes, because she knows what I do, so she didn’t care. My husband has been a super companion, he is working from home. There were changes in the family’s daily life, I have my mother, Marlene, 59 years old … We were adapting to everything ”, she says.

Considering the profession as a priesthood, as it involves love and dedication, Luana believes that, if the period put us to the test, “it is necessary to take the letter”. The daughter’s idea may have come from a scene she watched: “I work at the hospital and I also care for people at home, to treat injuries. My husband needed an injection some time ago and I gave it to him. She saw it and must have recorded it in her memory ”.






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STRENGTH OF AFFECTION Although the mother has a 20-year degree in physiotherapy, Giovana Astolfi Cardoso, aged 11, never entered a hospital. “She never saw me working at the CTI (intensive care center) at Santa Casa BH, where I have worked for 18 years,” says Rozana Astolfi Cardoso, married to Klaus Cardoso, who is not in the health field, and also a mother to Arthur, 14. “So, it was all the imagination”, reveals the resident of the Serra neighborhood, in the Center-South region of the capital.



Maria Cecília, 11, with her sister Ana Cláudia, 15, and her parents, doctors Gilberto and Cláudia: comic book routine


© Personal archive / disclosure
Maria Cecília, 11, with her sister Ana Cláudia, 15, and her parents, doctors Gilberto and Cláudia: comic book routine

Giovana uses the same word, imagination, to explain her drawing: in the hospital room, receiving the medication intravenously and supported with a right hand on a cane, an elderly woman receives the stimulus of a young person: “Come, you can do it”. For Giovana, a 5th year elementary school student, the traits try to translate the need for the lady to exercise, and the commitment of the other person, in this case her mother, to help her. On this Children’s Day, the girl agrees that the best gift would be the vaccine against COVID-19, because, with the massive immunization, she could be reunited with family, school friends and friends.

Aware of her daughter’s words, Rozana considers the quarantine period started in March to be an even greater challenge for those who have an 11-year-old daughter and a teenager. “God was wonderful with me. The situation is not easy, but I take care not to contaminate my family. Fortunately, I didn’t have the disease. ” Seven months after the start of the pandemic, the physiotherapist highlights the maturity of her children and the permanent dedication to her chosen profession. “I love my profession and my family. That feeling gives us security in times like this. ”

HEART TRACES

For almost seven months, intensive care physicians Lucas Timm Pisoler and Ana Carolina Marques Barbosa de Oliveira Pisoler, residents of the capital, have not met their children Maria Luíza, 7, and João Lucas, 6. Working at CTI, the couple preferred leaving children with their maternal grandparents in Lagoa Santa, in the Metropolitan Region of Belo Horizonte. “We only see children on the weekend, even from a distance. It is not an easy situation, but it is essential to avoid risks ”, says Ana Carolina, who works at Santa Casa and Hospital Belo Horizonte.






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Even from a distance and without ever having visited their parents’ workplace, Malu and Joãozinho, as they are affectionately called as a family, have recreated the CTI environment, not forgetting the intensive care equipment and equipment in the room. Seeing the art of the duo, Ana Carolina was moved: “Look! They even put on the green clothes I wear at the hospital! ”.



Simone Morais showed how her father imagines, the nursing technician José Fábio de Morais, using protective equipment


© Personal archive / disclosure
Simone Morais showed how her father imagines, the nursing technician José Fábio de Morais, using protective equipment

On Friday morning, right after the online school assignments, Malu and Joãozinho talked over the phone about the drawing, thanking them for their compliments. Next to it, Grandma Virgínia commented on the joy of having her grandchildren at home: “With them here, I’m beating COVID-19 from 7 to 0”.

A phrase said by Maria Cecília Murta de Oliveira, 11 years old, stayed in the head and well engraved in the heart of the infectious disease doctor Cláudia Murta de Oliveira: “Your work, mother, is very important. You help a lot of people in the hospital ”. When repeating the words, Cláudia mixes tears and smiles, as she knows that each letter gives strength to continue working in the Hospital Infection Control Service of Santa Casa BH. The team also works with research on antibiotics and vaccines.

Married to the orthopedist Gilberto Byrro, Cláudia was surprised by the wealth of details contained in her daughter’s drawing. As if it were a clipping of a comic book, showing the daily life of the infectious medical doctor, there are scenes and dialogues in the research laboratory in front of a patient, on the way home and even an online consultation, at night. “Since the beginning of the pandemic, we have been working harder than usual. And she showed it ”, she observes.






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Maria Cecília hopes that everything will soon pass for life to return to normal soon: “When we have a vaccine against COVID-19, it will be very cool”. Even with a drawing that touches the heart, the girl does not think about being an artist of the line. For now, the desire is to follow in the footsteps of parents and graduate in medicine.

PROTECTION Children’s creativity has no limit, much less the path of a pencil sliding over the blank sheet of paper. Simone de Fátima da Silva Morais, 7, imagines her father, nursing technician José Fábio de Morais, using all the personal protective equipment necessary for those working in the hospital. In the drawing, she still makes a declaration of love: “My dad is awesome. He takes care of patients too ”. The most surprising thing is that the father is next to a respirator, a fundamental device for victims hospitalized with COVID-19.



Maria Luíza with her brother, João Lucas, and her parents, Lucas and Ana Carolina: drawing with details of appliances and even a uniform


© Personal archive / Disclosure
Maria Luíza with her brother, João Lucas, and her parents, Lucas and Ana Carolina: drawing with details of appliances and even a uniform

Simone does not hide that she is afraid of an injection, although she knows the vital importance of the vaccine to rid the world of evil. José Fábio explains that none of the three children – the oldest, Simone, Samuel, 5, and Maria Júlia, 3 – went into a hospital, but they know the environment through the video calls that the father usually makes during his free time.

The family lives in the Rosarinho neighborhood, in Santa Luzia, near the border with Belo Horizonte, and José Fábio says that he has worked at Santa Casa BH since 2007. Remembering that times have not been easy for anyone, especially for health professionals, the technician of nursing, married to Alcione de Fátima da Silva Morais, guarantees that to work in the area, it is essential to love what you do. And it has a philosophy: “Life is to live and survive”.

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