What does the designation “clos” mean for certain wines?

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What does the designation




Whether you are an amateur or a connoisseur, you have certainly already come across the wine appellation "clos"... But what is behind it? Olivier Poels enlightens us in the show "The Table of the Bons Vivants" by Laurent Mariotte.


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Whether you are an amateur or a connoisseur, you have certainly already come across the “closed” wine appellation … But what is behind it? Olivier Poels enlightens us in the program “La Table des Bons Vivants” by Laurent Mariotte.

What is hidden behind the wine appellation “clos”, in particular for wines from Burgundy? “When we talk about closed wine, we are talking about wine of protected origin”, explains Olivier Poels in the Laurent Mariotte program. The Table of the Bons Vivants. “This mention of ‘clos’ concerns plots that are framed, surrounded by walls. Historically, it is a terroir, in a way isolated and that we could not pass on horseback.”

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The fruit of chance?

Did the vines in these enclosed spaces belong to individuals? Was the care given to the latter more important? “Well, we don’t really know,” comments the columnist. “Can you imagine that these enclosures appeared in the Middle Ages from the 12th century and we do not quite know why certain plots, at that time, were surrounded by walls.”

But since time, many theories have emerged. It could, for example, be a recourse to remove this parcel from the rest of the wine-growing land and this made it possible to pay less taxes. Or because we felt that the terroir of this plot was more qualitative.

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Grand Cru sign

The appellation “clos” is found especially in Burgundy in areas such as Clos de Tart or Clos Vougeot. But also in Moselle or in Languedoc. “This name is often synonymous with Grand Cru“, emphasizes Olivier Poels. Proof of its quality, it can be kept for 10, 20 or 30 years.” But beware, because often this gives rise to prices that are a bit high because it becomes a marketing argument. “You have been warned.

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