A pregnancy test designed for blind and visually impaired women

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A pregnancy test designed for blind and visually impaired women


In Europe, China and the United States alone, there are 2 million visually impaired women of childbearing age, according to the Royal Institute of Blind People (RNIB), a UK charitable organization to assist people visually impaired. These are as many potential pregnancies as the current tests, those that can easily be bought in pharmacies or supermarkets, are not able to correctly announce to the interested party.

A discriminating reality among others that the RNIB wanted to address, through Design for Everyone, its major innovation campaign which aims to create a more inclusive world for the blind and visually impaired. A world that would allow everyone essential respect for their private life, in particular.

“From managing finances to accessing private health information, privacy is important no matter who you are. But blind and partially sighted people are often denied their right to privacy due to the inaccessibility of design and information, “deplores the institute’s website. “The pregnancy test is a poignant example, as blind and partially sighted women often have no choice but to involve others in the reading of their results. This means their private information is made public. ”And their privacy is often compromised.

So that they are “the first to know their own news”

“Accessible design is important,” insists the organization. “And to prove that it is possible, we created a prototype pregnancy test that would allow women to be the first to know their own news.” Necessary.



The countryside


© Design For Everyone
The countryside

In order to design it as closely as possible to the needs of users, the independent designer Josh Wasserman, at the origin of the project, spoke at length with the first concerned. He then developed a luminous model, slightly larger than the traditional stick and with nodules that lift up when the result is positive. Details that lead to better tactile navigation.

On the price side, if the 3D printed prototype will cost a little more than the standard tests, says the RNIB, the latter has posted the reproduction instructions online free of charge, so that people with the necessary equipment can make a home copy. A solution which, we agree, is not within everyone’s reach.

Regarding the concept, however, this is a great step forward which underlines the essential nature of greater accessibility among everyday products, unfortunately still too well thought out to correspond to a validistic standard. And which, we hope, will quickly invade the market.

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