Volvo V90 B5 AWD in the long-term test: Part 1

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Volvo V90 B5 AWD in the long-term test: Part 1




Volvo V90 (2021) in the long-term test, part 1


© Motor1.com manufacturer
Volvo V90 (2021) in the long-term test, part 1

You may remember the time when station wagons were more popular than SUVs. Long time ago. Back then was Volvo the measure of all things and other manufacturers tried that fantastic teamwork from quality, safety and practicality to copy. My personal favorite Volvo is one of the later models: Volvo V70 (year of manufacture: 2000 to 2007). It was the time when Volvo design had reached its zenith (in my opinion) for the past 20 years: timelessly elegant.

However, new models like the V90 are by no means ugly, albeit a bit clunkier. With its design, Volvo still stands out from the homogeneous mass of automobiles like horse meat from Ikea Köttbularn. But in aesthetic terms! Everyone who likes station wagons will sooner or later ask themselves the question: How about a Volvo? They’re good, aren’t they?

To answer this question, we test the V90 for several months in our daily editorial work. But which variant should it be? The range of engines includes diesel and petrol with an output between 197 and 300 hp. We opt for the middle: 235 hp diesel. Diesel, because this car screams for long haul, the V90 is in the tradition of Swedish vacation kilometer-eaters who can shoot from Stockholm to Lisbon. Without stopping, of course, loaded with luggage and children, who oscillate between total exhaustion and unspeakably destructive anger. This is what station wagons were invented for!

Doubtful chocolate resistance

Especially when it comes to children, our test car reveals weaknesses in detail. The optional “Wool Sports Seats” (1,250 euros) are extremely bad when it comes to removing a sun-soaked range of Celebrations chocolate bars from the deep pores of the covers.



Volvo V90 (2021) in the long-term test, part 1


© Motor1.com Germany
Volvo V90 (2021) in the long-term test, part 1



Volvo V90 (2021) in the long-term test, part 1


© Motor1.com Germany
Volvo V90 (2021) in the long-term test, part 1

But before I get lost in the details: What features does the 4.95-meter station wagon have and what does it cost? The test car has the “Inscription” equipment from 66,450 euros. This is at the price level of the “R Design” equipment and below the off-road “Cross Country” variant. With a few extras, the price increases to 85,510 euros.

In addition to the seats already mentioned, the V90 also has the following options: “Winter Package Pro” (1,450 euros). These include auxiliary heating and child seats that are integrated into the rear seats and can be adjusted in two stages. Furthermore, the metallic paintwork “Thunder Gray” costs 1,000 euros, the 19-inch rims 900 euros, the trailer hitch 1,100 euros and the air suspension on the rear axle 1,970 euros.

Extras, Extras, Extras

The “Xenium Pro package” (4,950 euros) is also on board. This includes a 360-degree camera, a fine dust filter system, the “Sensus Connect” infotainment system, four-zone automatic air conditioning and a panoramic glass roof. As a separate package, the V90 also has the “Bowers & Wilkins” sound system (3,940 euros).



Volvo V90 (2021) in the long-term test, part 1


© Motor1.com Germany
Volvo V90 (2021) in the long-term test, part 1



Volvo V90 (2021) in the long-term test, part 1


© Motor1.com Germany
Volvo V90 (2021) in the long-term test, part 1

Because you’ve probably wondered the whole time whether you can drive the Volvo V90 through raging waters: No, the fording depth is only 25 centimeters. There is also no snorkel for the engine and Volvo doesn’t mention the ability to swim. So it would be better if you go over bridges.

More station wagons

The trailer load is 2,200 kilos – that is identical to a Porsche Panamera Sport Turismo. If you need more facts to tell your children to help them fall asleep, I have something for them: In 2020, Volvo sold 3,396 S90 and V90 models in Germany. The BMW 5 Series was sold 26,540 times in the same period. This shows that although everyone knows Volvo and what these cars look like, they are quite rare. At least in Germany. That is one of the reasons that speak in favor of the V90 – certainly not a monotony.

Safer than a prison cell locked from the inside !?

Another reason that could speak for the V90 is the lavish security features. Without her he wouldn’t be a Volvo! Probably the most controversial feature is the speed limit to 180 km / h. The so-called “Care Key” pursues a similar idea. This allows you to set a speed limit they set when lending your vehicle to family members (whom you don’t trust), friends (whom you don’t trust) and novice drivers (whom no one trusts). The orange key is part of the standard equipment in all versions and is supplied in addition to the normal black key.



Volvo V90 (2021) in the long-term test, part 1


© Motor1.com Germany
Volvo V90 (2021) in the long-term test, part 1



Volvo V90 (2021) in the long-term test, part 1


© Motor1.com Germany
Volvo V90 (2021) in the long-term test, part 1

The rest of the arsenal of assistance corresponds to the state of the art, which is now offered by many car manufacturers. This includes the emergency braking system with automatic vehicle, motorcyclist, pedestrian, cyclist and wild animal detection. Steering assistance is activated when emergency braking is insufficient to prevent an accident. Prerequisite: the driver must trigger the steering impulse – the system supports it. An additional emergency braking function comes into action when there is oncoming traffic in your own lane: if a collision is imminent, the brake intervention reduces the speed by up to 10 km / h in order to reduce the force of the impact.

Swedish steel becomes boron steel

In addition to these and other electronic helpers, Volvo also attaches great importance to so-called passive safety – i.e. everything that protects if it bangs. This should be achieved through a high proportion of hot-formed boron steel in the body. It is currently the hardest type of steel used in vehicle body construction. Volvo does not say exactly how high the proportion is. With a weight of 1,890 kilos, the V90 is still not one of the ultra-heavy models in its class.

The engine of the B5 AWD is a two-liter in-line four-cylinder that distributes its 235 diesel horsepower to all four wheels. This powertrain works with a 48-volt mild hybrid system. According to the WLTP, consumption should be between 6.5 and 7.2 liters. In part two of the endurance test, I will clarify whether it succeeds in what we think of the overall package and its suitability for everyday use and what effects Volvo’s technology and marketing change will have on the V90.

Motor2.0-liter four-cylinder biturbo diesel (48-volt mild hybrid)
power235 PS (bei 4.000 U/min)
Max. Torque480 Nm (1,750 – 2,250 rpm)
Empty weight1.890 kg
Top speed180 km / h
Acceleration 0-100 km / h7.2 sec.
consumption6,5 – 7,2 l (WLTP)
Gear typeAchtgang-Automatik
Long4.945 mm
width1.895 mm
height1.475 mm
Trunk volume560 – 1.526 l
Payload510 kg
Ground clearance15,6 cm
Wattiefe25 cm
Trailer load2.200 kg
drivePermanent four-wheel drive
Number of seats5
Base price66.450 Euro
Price of the test car85.510 Euro

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