About successful, incorrect and missing vaccination campaigns

0
0
About successful, incorrect and missing vaccination campaigns




Photo: APA / ROBERT JAEGER


© In Vienna, vaccinations are carried out in the Austria Center. / Picture: APA / ROBERT JAEGER
Photo: APA / ROBERT JAEGER


3G, 2G, lockdown for the unvaccinated, lockdown for everyone – and then there was another general compulsory vaccination announced: Austria is the first country in Europe that has adopted this for the corona virus, others could follow suit. Still others already have much higher vaccination rates.

And what actually happened in Austria apart from restrictions in order to convince doubters and hesitants of the vaccination? On the one hand there were large national campaigns in the mass media, on the other hand there were campaigns such as the vaccination lottery im Burgenland (which still leads the vaccination statistics). The country with the lowest vaccination rate – Oberösterreich – and ultimately that too ORF took over the model. Vienna was already beating the drum in the summer – with various campaigns, such as vaccinations on the boat or at concerts. In contrast, money gifts for vaccinations – as elsewhere – were not given out in Austria, even if some did see it as a viable option.

Susanna Bastaroli writes in a detailed analysis that several countries in southern Europe with high vaccination rates have so far been able to successfully slow the fourth wave. Examples from the article: “Every inhabitant of Portugal and Spain, graded according to age group, was contacted several times personally and invited to the corona vaccination with an appointment, this is also the case with the booster vaccination. Rome also worked with vaccination SMS, advertising the vaccination with posters and TV spots and addressing young people directly via TikTok and Instagram. In the summer before school started, France also vied for young people willing to vaccinate – with success. ”In Portugal led a general started the “campaign” against Corona. Of course, a certain amount of pressure was also applied: in France and Italy there was an early compulsory vaccination for professions in the health sector, tests are chargeable in Italy. In Austria, which tests on a large scale, (PCR) tests are still free.

Speaking of tests: In Vienna, SPÖ City Councilor for Health Peter Hacker announced that that a lockdown end will be followed by a general 2-G plus in Vienna. And the city is now sending fixed appointments to those who have not been vaccinated. “Why now?”, wonders about Teresa Wirth.

At the beginning of November opposed it Martin Fritzl in an editorial: “It is not too late for a real vaccination campaign”. What does he mean by that? A campaign “that is not limited to a few advertisements, but rather specifically addresses the individual groups – from the young to the rural population to migrant communities.” Something similar also writes a columnist Christian Ortner. He asks himself: Wouldn’t it be helpful to use a social science study to reveal the objectors’ motives? “

Infectiologist Christoph Wenisch is also thinking about these same motives. In an interview with Koksal Baltaci he says many patients are scared. And he also thinks that one should not only rely on traditional mass media but also on social media, on influencers, on TikTok. He also reports: “In Vienna, for example, the authorities in the Turkish community made great progress in vaccination by promoting the Biontech-Pfizer vaccine as a ‘Turkish vaccine'” (the developers are from Turkey). The inclusion of religious communities is also useful. “

Discuss with: What was done to convince and educate the Austrian population about a vaccination? Was that enough What irritated you? Are other countries doing better? And if so, why is that?

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here